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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Date:Tuesday October 24th, 2017

Time: 2:00pm-3:30pm (CST) 

Abusers often use the threat of immigration enforcement as a way to maintain power and control and to make victims less likely to seek protection. For this reason, it is important for advocates to understand how to: help immigrant survivors become aware of their rights; identify immigration remedies for victims, including special VAWA provisions around confidentiality; prepare enhanced safety plans for immigrant survivors; and increase meaningful access to services for immigrants and survivors with limited English proficiency. This training will also provide updates on recent immigration policy developments and new enforcement measures that impact immigrant survivors.

Through this webinar, participants will learn: 

  • Implement enhanced safety planning for immigrant survivors 
  • Learn about family preparedness resources in case a parent is placed in immigration detention 
  • Strengthen community collaborations
  • Access reliable and updated resources for helping immigrant survivors.

Presenter: 

Rosie Hildalgo, Senior Director of Public Policy, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network

Rosie Hidalgo serves as the Senior Director of Public Policy for Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities (Casa/NLN). Rosie previously served as the Deputy Director for Policy at the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) at the U.S. Department of Justice. Prior to working at OVW, Rosie had worked as the National Policy Director at Casa/NLN and served on the Steering Committee of the National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence where she played an active role in national advocacy efforts to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in 2013. Rosie previously worked at the National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence and as an attorney at legal services programs for low-income families in New York City and in Northern Virginia. Rosie, the daughter of immigrants from Cuba, has spent a total of ten years as an adult living in three different countries in Latin America, including living in the Dominican Republic from 2002-2006, where she helped establish and coordinate a community-based domestic violence prevention and intervention network and worked as a consultant for the World Bank on social services reforms. Rosie received her undergraduate degree from Georgetown University and her law degree from New York University School of Law. In 2015 Rosie received the 20/20 Vision Award from the American Bar Association Commission on Domestic and Sexual Violence.

Register now.

 

 

 

 

 

Date: Monday October 30th, 2017

Time: 1:00pm-2:30pm (CST) 

In this webinar the presenters will provide practitioners with accessible language to describe the overlap between trauma informed and culturally specific aspects of their work. It will begin with the presentation of trauma-informed and culturally specific principles that were developed based on what the NLN has learned from culturally-specific practitioners across the domestic violence field. Then, the presenters will discuss findings from a national research project designed to evaluate culturally-specific and trauma-informed aspects of service for Latina survivors.

Through this webinar, participants will: 

  • Build their knowledge in trauma informed principles through a culturally-specific lens.
  • Build their knowledge in evaluating trauma informed and culturally-specific work with Latinas.
  • Learn about the results of a national study evaluating culturally-specific and trauma informed practice with Latinas.

Presenters: 

Dr. Josephine V. Serrata, Director of Research and Evaluation, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network

Josephine V. Serrata, Ph.D. is a clinical community psychologist and director of research and evaluation at the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities, a project of Casa de Esperanza. Her research and evaluation work are embedded in practices that are culturally affirming and community driven. Her research includes studying the intersections of domestic violence with issues of oppression, privilege and strength in Latin@ families and communities. Her evaluation experiences have included evaluating community based prevention and engagement efforts, including a leadership intervention for immigrant Latina survivors of domestic violence. Her clinical work focuses on trauma informed, culturally relevant approaches. She also serves as the Director of Professional Development for the Latina Researchers Network, which aims to support diverse scholars in academia and advanced research careers. “Josie” is a Latina of mixed heritage (Panamanian and Mexican-American) from San Antonio, TX and proud mother of two boys.

Dr. Rebecca Rodriguez, Manager of Research and Evaluation, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network 

Rebecca Rodriguez, Ph.D. is a community psychologist and manager of research and evaluation at the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities. Rebecca's research interests broadly focus on culturally specific and community-centered approaches to prevent family violence in Latino@ families. Her research has examined marital and dating violence by investigating family dynamics (e.g. gender roles, parenting), U.S. immigration policies, and by working directly with Latin@ youth witnesses and survivors of violence in conducting participatory action research on topics they find important to their communities.  Her evaluation work includes participatory and culturally responsive evaluation practices and developing the evaluation capacity of community based organizations. Rebecca enjoys mentoring students and is interested in increasing the number of Latino researchers. As a child of Mexican migrant farm laborers, she is also passionate about social justice for migrant and seasonal laborers.

Register now.