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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

The Increasing Language Access in the Courts toolkit:

  • examines advocates’ observations about the court experiences of survivors with limited English proficiency, and
  • offers guidance and resources to build systems change efforts for language accessibility.

In 2013, we conducted a nationwide assessment of court-based language accessibility for survivors of domestic and sexual violence. Nearly 600 people responded, most of whom worked for community-based sexual and domestic violence programs. We learned that interpretation and translation services for civil matters and filing court documents are available about half the time for Spanish speakers, and about one quarter of the time for people who speak languages (other than Spanish) that are common in the community. The first section of the toolkit,Assessment of English Language access for Survivors, summarizes assessment results, including the known consequences of limited language access services for survivors.

In the interest of supporting advocates’ role in building court access for survivors, the second part of the toolkit, How to Improve Language Access for Survivors, offers concrete information and tools for advocates seeking to increase language accessibility:

  • Before court” resources include a pre-court checklist and clear and simple descriptions of the federal laws and guidelines that frame courts’ obligations to provide quality language access services.
  • At court” resources include talking points and strategies for in-court individual advocacy
  • After court” resources include a training curriculum for use with court personnel and a step-by-step guide for planning systems change advocacy.

This project was supported by Grant No. 2012-TA-AX-K023 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, US Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

Increasing Language Access in Courts Tool Kit PDF Increasing Language Access in Courts Tool Kit PPT in English

 

 

 

Mejorando el Acceso al Idioma en las Cortes PDF

We offer training and consultation, something we (and the federal government) also call “technical assistance” or “TA.” Through our national resource center, we help community-based organizations, coalitions, state agencies, federally funded grantees, and other TA Providers prevent gender-based violence and improve their response when it comes to Latin@ communities. Check out the full list of topics we cover below.

We customize our TA offering to your needs and so we’ll help however makes sense to you - via phone, email, webinar, conferences, customized training, one-to-one consultation, and on-site assistance. If you’re interested in receiving TA or just have a question about it, email us at ta@casadeesperanza.org.

What We Train On

  • Gender-Based Violence Service Provision: Get the basics of domestic violence, sexual assault, trafficking, and stalking and/or delve into how to support Latin@ survivors and subpopulations within that group like immigrants, those living with disabilities or who are Hard of Hearing, LGBTQ communities, men and boys, students, youth, and bystanders.
  • Culture Matters: Learn how oppression and culture intersect with gender-based violence; Latin@ realities, leadership, and social norms; and how to improve cultural responsiveness whether in your own organization, via the justice system, or in your community at large.
  • Community Engagement: Use Casa de Esperanza’s tools to engage Latin@ communities in ending gender-based violence. We teach a whole-community approach and can help you identify and engage local Latin@ leaders, families, men and boys, and youth.
  • Enhancing Services for Individuals with Limited English Proficiency: Whether your organization is just starting its language access plan or you’re evaluating existing offerings, we can help you meaningfully enhance your ability to offer culturally and linguistically specific/accessible services.
  • Trauma: We help organizations better understand childhood, historical, vicarious, and inter-generational trauma, guiding you through offering trauma-informed services, addressing vicarious trauma, building resilience, and practicing self-care.
  • Advocacy: Use our strength-based approach to advocacy to enhance your crisis intervention skills and better serve the Latin@ community. We can help you change systems, at your organization and within your community, to meet the unique needs of the Latin@ community.
  • Policy Topics: Understand how federal laws and guidelines from the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) to the “Public Charge” rules to the Department of Justice (DOJ) guidance on policing affect you. We also train on how to responsibly engage in policy advocacy to better protect Latin@ and immigrant survivors.
  • Organizational Capacity Building: Assess your readiness to serve Latin@s and leverage our training to build meaningful collaborations, develop your leadership, fundraise and manage awards, handle transition, increase inclusion and equity, develop programs, and respond to trauma.
  • Outreach & Awareness: Learn how to meaningfully and responsibly conduct public awareness campaigns, use social media, develop strong materials, and uplift survivors’ voices.
  • Documentation & Information Management: Explore needs assessment approaches and learn how to develop an evaluation plan, set outcome measurements, collect data, and use community-centered, evidence-based practices.

Request Training

To inquire about any of the above training, consultations, and TA, please email us at ta@casadeesperanza.org.

Adolescent and Young Adult Health National Capacity Building Program

Application deadline: March 27, 2018


Last week, HRSA/MCHB posted a notice of funding opportunity, the Adolescent and Young Adult Health National Capacity Building Program, HRSA-18-082. Its purpose is to is to improve the health of adolescents and young adults (ages 10-25) by strengthening the capacity of state maternal and child health programs and their clinical partners to address the needs of these population groups.  Within the unique needs of this population, this program includes a focus on behavioral health. HRSA expects to make a single award with a project period of 5 years and an annual budget of $1.15 million.
 
Click here for more information about this opportunity and to apply
 

Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program

Application deadline: April 17, 2018

HUD recently announced a new  Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA)  to competitively award $43 million for the second round of the Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program (YHDP). These funds will provide up to 11 communities, including at least 5 rural communities, with resources to design and implement a coordinated community approach to preventing and ending homelessness.  Applications for the YHDP are due before midnight eastern time on  April 17, 2018.
 
Click here for more information about this opportunity and to apply