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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Date:Monday May 22nd 

Time: 2:00 - 3:30pm (Central)

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act requires equal access to courts for all. However, some courts are still finding it challenging to provide access to people with limited English proficiency. The National Latin@ Network of Casa de Esperanza has developed a tool kit to help. In this webinar participants will be informed of the Title VI requirements, help strategize how advocates can work with courts, prosecutors and others to meet the requirements of Title VI. Through this interactive webinar participants will increase their capacity to: improve language access to local courthouse services during legal proceedings, and advocate for increased language access services. Participants will also explore the toolkit and examine their role in helping survivor’s access justice.

In this webinar, participants will learn:

  •       Understand the legal rights to meaningful language access of survivors with limited English proficiency.
  •       Understand when a court interpreter is required and how and when to advocate for a survivor’s rights to adequate interpretation services.
  •       Understand the importance of cultural relevance in interpretation.

Presenter: Olga Trujillo, Director of Education and Advocacy, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network

Olga Trujillo is an attorney, speaker, author and survivor. Her experience over the past 27 years has been as a private attorney, an attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, and a consultant to many local, state and national organizations. Olga is an internationally sought speaker and author and is featured in the video “A Survivor’s Story,” a documentary and training video based on her personal experience of violence. Olga has authored a number of articles and publications. Her memoir for New Harbinger Publications, titled “The Sum of My Parts,” was released in October 2011. She also co-authored a Handbook for Attorneys “Representing Domestic Violence Survivors Who Are Also Experiencing Trauma and Mental Health Challenges,” which was released in January 2012. 

Register now.

 

***Pending OVW Approval***

 

 

Fecha: Jueves, el 25 de mayo del 2017

Hora: 10:00 - 10:30  de la mañana (hora central)

De acuerdo a la ley en los Estados Unidos la trata de personas consiste en el acto de reclutar, albergar, transportar, proveer u obtener una persona para trabajo forzado o para el comercio de actos sexuales a través del uso de la fuerza, fraude o coerción. La complejidad en que este crimen ocurre lo convierte en una cuestión de interés mundial, dado que diariamente miles de personas son víctimas de este crimen. Y la respuesta más común se ha centrado en la definición del crimen, la identificación de las víctimas y el enjuiciamiento de todos los involucrados. Sin embargo, cuando empezamos a describir la experiencia de la trata de personas y cuál es el impacto que tiene en diferentes comunidades, es importante tener en cuenta y ser cuidadoso acerca del hecho de no confundir que los actos criminales llevados acabos por individuos no son el reflejo completo de un grupo étnico o de su cultura, especialmente en el caso de las comunidades que han sido históricamente más afectadas. Es aquí donde la evidencia basada en la investigación culturalmente sensible puede ayudar a identificar cuáles son los estereotipos que afectan nuestro entendimiento de la complejidad en que se da la trata de personas. La Red Nacional Latina ha venido realizando investigaciones tratando de entender y abordar este tema desde el punto de vista de la comunidad Latina. Martha Hernández, Gerente de Investigación de la Red Nacional Latina compartirá su experiencia de una tarea tan desalentadora no sólo como científica social, sino como investigadora latina. 

Date: Wednesday May 31st  

Time: 11:00am - 12:30pm (Central)

Sense of Community is positively linked to community participation and mental health (Peterson, Speer, & McMillian, 2008; Ohmer, 2007). For this reason, connection to grassroots organizations and Latinx identity may help explain the success of promotora and similar peer-model programs. In this webinar, Dr. Macias will present the results of a community-based study of domestic violence (DV) workshops led by Latina immigrant DV survivors who completed Casa de Esperanza’s adapted Líderes training program.

In this webinar, participants will learn:

  •  To review peer-model research and become familiar with structure and aims of Casa de Esperanza’s Leadership Training Program for Latinas (Líderes).
  •  Gain a better understanding of ways to leverage community connection in community-based prevention.
  •  Explore examples of the use of testimonio in gender-based violence initiatives.

Presenter: Lillianne Macias

Lillianne Macias received her PhD in Clinical and Community Psychology from Georgia State University. She is a graduate of the research partnership between Casa de Esperanza and Georgia State University established under the direction of Julia Perilla, PhD, and completed a psychology fellowship through The Yale School of Medicine.  She will be joining the community psychology faculty at The University of New Haven as an Assistant Professor in the fall of 2017. Her research interests include the adaptation and evaluation of culture-specific programs for Latinx and other underserved communities. As a scientist-practitioner, her experiences in community-based research inform her work as an individual and group therapist in university and community settings. 

Register now.

 

 

Date: Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Time: 2:00-2:30 pm (Central)

This BTR session will be taking place in commemoration of the Annual International World Elder Abuse Awareness Day observed on June 15. Each year, the NLN promotes events and activities that raise awareness about elder abuse, including neglect, maltreatment, and mistreatment of elder adults throughout the world. Join us for a conversation among the National Latin@ Network and other partners in the field working at the intersections of elder abuse and culture.

In this episode, we will discuss: 

  •  Elder abuse and its impact.
  • Share effective practices to respond to elder abuse.
  • Promote relevant tools and resources.

Listen Live.

Presenter: Heidi Notario, Director of Implementation & Social Change, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network

Heidi Notario, M.A. serves as the Director of Implementation & Social Change of the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities and Casa de Esperanza. Prior to joining Casa’s team, Heidi was the Training Specialist at the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV). She has expertise on issues related to accessibility through her work at the intersections of disabilities and violence against women. She has written a number of resources for survivors’ advocates and provides ongoing training and technical assistance on a variety of violence against women’s issues. Heidi’s interests include a wide array of topics related to the treatment afforded to survivors of violence with disabilities, Deaf survivors, and other traditionally underserved communities by the criminal justice system, service providers, and society at large. She keeps on the forefront of her anti-oppression work the elimination of barriers that impact immigrant survivors and the LGBTQ community. Heidi views “accessibility” from a human rights perspective and is committed to bringing this framework into her work and personal life. Heidi is originally from Cuba and has resided in the U.S. since 1995.

 

 

 

 

 

Date:Tuesday June 13th, 2017 

Time: 2:00 - 3:30pm (Central)

Older adult survivors of abuse have a complex set of circumstances and often poor options to consider. Elder abuse survivors may have additional needs requiring service providers to examine how they are currently delivering services and how their policies and practices may help or hinder an older survivor.

In this webinar, participants will learn:

  • How generational issues may influence survivors’ choices, especially within communities who have experienced historical trauma and oppression.
  • The challenges experienced by Latin@ communities, including immigration and lack of linguistically accessible services.
  • Effective practices for successful collaborations among organizations and communities to meet the needs of Latin@ older survivors.

Presenters: 

Eden Ruiz-Lopez, Project Manager, National Center on Elder Abuse

Eden Ruiz-Lopez is a project manager at the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA). She leads grant management, responds to technical assistance inquiries, serves as an advisory board liaison, engages in education and outreach activities and coordinates the volunteer and internship program. She is currently an MPA candidate at the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy with an acute passion for socio-demographic and geographic trends, as well as issues of aging, public housing transformation, human rights and homelessness.  Prior to joining the NCEA, Eden directed a home modification and housing advocacy program for adults with disabilities and managed finances for adults who were adjudicated incapacitated and placed under guardianship. Eden earned her Bachelor’s degree in Human Development and Family Studies and a minor in Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University.

Heidi Notario, Director of Implementation and Social Change, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network

Heidi Notario, M.A. serves as the Director of Implementation & Social Change of the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities and Casa de Esperanza. Prior to joining Casa’s team, Heidi was the Training Specialist at the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV). She has expertise on issues related to accessibility through her work at the intersections of disabilities and violence against women. She has written a number of resources for survivors’ advocates and provides ongoing training and technical assistance on a variety of violence against women’s issues. Heidi’s interests include a wide array of topics related to the treatment afforded to survivors of violence with disabilities, Deaf survivors, and other traditionally underserved communities by the criminal justice system, service providers, and society at large. She keeps on the forefront of her anti-oppression work the elimination of barriers that impact immigrant survivors and the LGBTQ community. Heidi views “accessibility” from a human rights perspective and is committed to bringing this framework into her work and personal life. Heidi is originally from Cuba and has resided in the U.S. since 1995.

Register now.

 

***Pending OVW Approval***