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Key Issues and Implications for Policy, Research, and Service Provision

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, Latin@s account for 16% of the U.S population. There are approximately 50 million Latin@s from 22 countries of origin living in the United States, forming a very heterogeneous group that embraces varied histories, socio-economic backgrounds, as well as cultural and linguistic subtleties (Ennis, Rios-Vargas, & Albert, 2011).

Approximately, 40% of Latin@s living in the U.S. are foreign born, whereas others can trace their family roots in the U.S. back many generations. As a result, many Latin@ families have mixed levels of acculturation and English language proficiency. While the majority of Latin@s identify with the Spanish language, there is a growing population of indigenous Latin@s in the U.S. for whom Spanish is not their primary language. Therefore, understanding the great diversity that characterizes Latin@s living in and outside of the U.S. is a critical step in developing effective responses to violence when working with these communities. To that end, the information contained in this special collection is intended to offer insight into some aspects of this cultural group; however, we ask the reader to avoid making generalizations.

While the lives of Latin@ survivors are complex and each experience has its own characteristics, we have selected four key areas that will help us organize the materials in the next sections of this collection given their impact on Latin@ survivors: cultural relevance, language access, immigration, and economic justice. This selection is based on some of the most common barriers faced by Latin@ survivors and their families. We are highlighting best practices to overcome such obstacles by including resources from the perspectives of policy, research and service provision as much as possible. Our goal is to provide advocates and other readers with concrete tools to effectively work at the intersections of violence against women and Latin@ communities.

Cultural Relevance

Effective responses to domestic violence require a clear understanding of the lived realities of those experiencing the violence. An analysis of the Latin@ cultural lens and context are highlighted in the tools included below as well as specific aspects of the realities faced by Latin@ survivors. These complicate the decision whether to leave or stay in abusive relationships. For many survivors, their hope is for the violence to end. In the case of Latina women in particular, there are specific cultural aspects that play a key role in these decisions, such as the tremendous importance of family. Understanding these cultural values is critical in providing effective support to survivors on their journey.

The work of the Líderes and promotoras/promotores are examples of culturally specific approaches to engage communities while utilizing their natural strength and shared wisdom. The impact of both approaches is long lasting and transformative. Both share the vision of maximizing community resources and supporting the development of leadership from within the communities.   

Developed by Casa de Esperanza, the Líderes Program or the Latina Peer Education Initiative fosters and develops leadership from within Latin@ communities. This strategy aims to tap into the natural leadership among individuals, families and communities to share critical information and resources, build community, and promote healthy relationships. The initiative is led by the women who serve as Líderes (Peer Educators). Líderes develop the trainings and tools that will be used in the workshops – they recruit participants and promote the workshops in the community. Project goals are accomplished by recruiting, training and supporting Latina Líderes to engage other individuals and families to acquire knowledge, skills and resources for immediate and long-term health and stability.

Promotoras and Promotores are also community Líderes and their approach is equally effective. Promotoras started in Latin America as a way of reaching communities from within, on issues mostly related to health and wellness.  Promotoras serve as liaisons between their community, health professionals, and others. As liaisons, they often play the roles of educator, mentor, outreach worker, advocate and role model. This approach has been very effective in Latin America and its strength has become evident in communities across the U.S.

Resources offered below explore culturally responsive advocacy, leadership development for Latin@s, and survivor-centered approaches.

Creating a Culturally Responsive Advocacy Framework

  • Latina Advocacy Framework | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by Casa De Esperanza (2008)
    A diagram of the framework of Casa de Esperanza’s Latina Advocacy based on more than 30 years of direct work.
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  • On the Road to Social Transformation: Utilizing Cultural and Community Strengths to End Domestic Violence | PDF PDF (85 p.)
    by Elsa A. Rios for the National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence/Alianza Latina Nacional Para Errad
    This document is meant to inspire program innovation and a deeper commitment by service providers, policy makers and funders to building culturally proficient organizations capable of delivering quality services to diverse communities.
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Promoting Latin@ Leadership

Leadership Development for Latinas by Casa de Esperanza (Updated 2013)
This curriculum documents Casa de Esperanza’s approach to foster and develop leadership within Latin@ communities. This approach has been successfully adapted by several organizations across the country and, in 2011, was documented as an evidence-based curriculum that builds Latina leadership and increases participants’ knowledge of domestic violence. The overall goals of this project are to engage the natural leadership among individuals, families and communities to share critical information and resources, build community, and promote healthy relationships. These goals are realized through recruiting, training and supporting Latina Líderes to engage other individuals and families to acquire knowledge, skills and resources for immediate and long-term health and stability. To obtain a FREE copy of the curriculum, email Casa de Esperanza at: products@casadeesperanza.org.
  • An Evidence-Based Leadership Intervention for Latina Survivors of Domestic Violence | PDF PDF (24 p.)
    by Josie V. Serrata, PhD. (2013)
    The Líderes program was created in 2003 in response to Latinas in the Twin Cities of MN asking for leadership opportunities in their communities. In 2006, Casa de Esperanza developed a curriculum for the Líderes and in 2011 it was adopted by Caminar Latino in Atlanta, GA, and adapted for women survivors of domestic violence.
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  • Promoting the Development of Evidence-Based Practice: Líderes: An Evidence Based Curriculum | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by Amy Sanchez for SYNERGY, The Newsletter of the Resource Center on Domestic Violence: Child Protection & Custody. National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) (2013)
    This issue of Synergy is dedicated to immigration and child protection and custody issues in the context of domestic violence. This article highlights the Líderes program, a peer-education approach to raising awareness about domestic violence in Latin@ communities.
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  • I am a Leader | HTML HTML [3:49] by La Paz, Chattanooga (2013)
    This inspiring video describes the experiences of Latina women from Guatemala as they realized their inner leadership potential. This video is a great example of the strength of Latinas and Latin@ communities as resources for social change.
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LapPaz Leaders V3

Survivor-Centered Approaches

  • Respect and Resources | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Lupe Serrano (2004)
    The time that Latinas spend in shelter provides a great opportunity to expand their existing supports; and domestic violence agencies must be instrumental in creating community-based support systems. This article explores the elements of survivor-centered advocacy from a culturally specific perspective.
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  • Women who Stay: Perspectives of Latina Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence on Staying with or Leaving Abusive Partners | PDF PDF (10 p.)
    by R. Lillianne Macias, Alvina Rosales, Alfredo Morales, Josie Serrata and Julia Perilla (2013)
    This research study engaged Latina survivors staying with abusive partners and explored their experiences of staying and factors relevant to their decision to stay.
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  • A Community Psychologist's Perspective on Domestic Violence: A Conversation with Julia Perilla, Ph.D. | PDF PDF (9 p.)
    by Theodora Ooms for the Center for Law and Social Policy (May 2006)
    In this interview, Julia Perilla presents a community psychologist’s perspective on the definition of domestic violence, describes the importance of understanding the cultural, historical and economic context in which domestic violence occurs, the many ways in which violence can be experienced, and how these forms of violence are linked.
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  • Latin@s and IPV: An Evidence-Based Factsheet | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by Casa De Esperanza (2013)
    This factsheet presents a summary of data gleaned from current studies examining intimate partner violence in Latin@ populations.
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  • Defensa y Promoción de la Mujer Latina (Defense and Promotion of the Latina Woman) | PDF PDF (102 p.)
    by Alianza for National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence
    This manual was written as a guide with up-to-date basic information for all those who provide services to survivors; to provide survivors and their communities with basic information relevant to their rights; to provide an easy to understand guide to the different government systems and offices in the United States upon which the survival of Latin@ women (immigrant and non-immigrant) depends.
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  • Rompiendo el Silencio. Manual de entrenamiento para activistas, consejeras y organizadoras Latinas | PDFPDF (122 p.)
    by Sonia Parras Konrad (2003)
    Este manual ofrece información básica y esencial sobre nuestros derechos, el funcionamiento del sistema de protección para sobrevivientes de la violencia doméstica, y como trabajar para sobrepasar las barreras que existen en la sociedad que impiden que inmigrantes sobrevivientes de la violencia doméstica obtengan la protección necesaria contra el abuso.
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La Víctima y la Sobreviviente: A Latina Sexual Assault Victim Advocate's Toolkit (Bilingual) from Arte Sana (2005)
This toolkit contains original information created by Arte Sana as well as translations of existing data. The material is organized into ready-to-use formats including five PowerPoint presentations. This unique resource was created for bilingual victim advocates to promote healthy Latin@ communities, enhance sexual violence prevention efforts, and build awareness about victim rights.

  • Walking with Latin@ Survivors | HTML HTML [81:39]
    presented by Rosario de la Torre for Casa de Esperanza (October 24, 2012)
    This webinar highlights best practices for advocates when working with Latin@ survivors.
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  • Being Trauma-Informed: Expanding our Lenses |
    HTML HTML [88:47]
    presented by Julia Perilla and Josie Serrata for Casa de Esperanza (December 19, 2012)
    This webinar provides concrete information based on the practical work of culturally specific organizations, including their approaches and philosophies with survivors from historically underserved communities. Participants can learn how culturally specific organizations view trauma and the principles that shape our approach to ending violence in our communities.
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  • Teniendo en cuenta el trauma y expandiendo nuestra perspectiva | HTML HTML [74:27]
    presentado por las Doctoras Julia Perilla y Josie Serrata, Casa de Esperanza (December 12, 2012)
    Este seminario web provee información concreta basada en el trabajo práctico de organizaciones culturales específicas, incluyendo los enfoques y la filosofía de sobrevivientes de comunidades que han sido tradicionalmente poco servidas. Los participantes aprenderán cómo organizaciones que son culturalmente específicas entienden el trauma y los principios en que basamos nuestros enfoques para ponerle fin a la violencia en nuestras comunidades.
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Language Access

In 2011, approximately 21 percent (60.6 million) of individuals in the U.S. ages 5 and older spoke a language other than English at home. While the majority of those individuals also spoke English with native fluency or "very well," about 42 percent (or 25.3 million) were considered Limited English Proficient (LEP). Overall, LEP individuals represent 9 percent of the total US population ages 5 and older (Whatley & Batalova, 2013). While many immigrants in the U.S. come from non-English-speaking countries, not all immigrants are LEP. Of the total immigrant population in 2011, about half were LEP individuals.

Linguistic and cultural barriers represent one of the most difficult challenges for many survivors to overcome, and can lead to isolation from the community, discrimination, and a general lack of knowledge or misinformation regarding the U.S. legal system and its available resources. In order to provide enhanced safety planning and ensure meaningful access to services while supporting victims of domestic violence in making informed choices, it is imperative for those assisting them to fully address existing language barriers.

  • Increasing Language Access for Survivors of Domestic Violence Toolkit | PDF PDF ( p.)
    by the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a project of Casa de Esperanza (2013)
    This toolkit is a resource for organizations and advocates within the US to build their capacity to increase access to their own services for survivors with limited English proficiency.
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  • Realidades Latinas: A National Survey on the Impact of Immigration and Language Access on Latina Survivors | PDF PDF (17 p.)
    by The National Domestic Violence Hotline and the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a Project of Casa de Esperanza (2013)
    This report provides an analysis of the results of a survey administered over a period of six weeks to over 1,300 Hotline callers who identified as Latin@ survivors of domestic violence. The questions were geared towards survivors’ experiences accessing services and demonstrated the challenges faced by survivors due to language access issues.
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  • Ensuring Access to Services for Survivors with Limited English Proficiency: Frequently Asked Questions | PDF PDF (5 p.)
    by Casa De Esperanza (2011)
    This is a compilation of answers to frequently asked questions regarding Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, which requires all programs that receive federal funds to take reasonable steps to ensure meaningful access to individuals with Limited English Proficiency.
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  • Meaningful Access for Individuals with Limited English Proficiency | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by Rosie Hidalgo for SYNERGY, The Newsletter of the Resource Center on Domestic Violence: Child Protection & Custody. National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) (2013)
    This issue of Synergy is dedicated to immigration and child protection and custody issues in the context of domestic violence. This article describes the obstacles that victims with limited English proficiency face in our judicial system and how to improve the situation for them and their families.
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  • Civil Rights Guidance to Federal Financial Assistance Recipients Regarding Title VI Prohibition against National Origin Discrimination Affecting Limited English Proficient Persons | PDF PDF (5 p.)
    by the United States Department of Justice, Office for Civil Rights (August 2010)
    This document contains guidance to ensure language access to LEP domestic violence survivors that are seeking to receive services from organizations receiving federal funding such as domestic violence and sexual assault programs.
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  • Ensuring Language Access to Immigrant Victims of Sexual Assault | PDF PDF (18 p.)
    by Leslye Orloff, Amanda Baran, and Martha Cohen for The National Immigrant Women's Advocacy Project, in Empowering Survivors: Legal Rights of Immigrant Victims of Sexual Assault (2010)
    This Chapter demonstrates that although immigrant victims can legally access services that are available to protect victims regardless of immigration status, such as sexual assault and domestic violence services, law enforcement protection, and immigration relief, many immigrant victims are unlikely to seek help due to language barriers, isolation, and lack of information about available help.
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  • Ensuring Meaningful Access for Survivors with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) | HTML HTML [93:55]
    by Rosie Hidalgo, for Casa de Esperanza (July 30, 2013)
    According to the U.S. Census, over 25 million people over the age of five living in the United States speak a language other than English, and do not speak English very well. In order to carry out enhanced safety planning, ensure meaningful access to services, and provide critical information to assist survivors in making informed choices, it is imperative to ensure meaningful access to services for ALL survivors. This webinar reviews key issues related to ensuring access for survivors with LEP.
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Immigration

The experiences and challenges of Latin@ immigrant survivors of violence are often compounded by numerous barriers that impede their access to mainstream services and systems of support and undermine access to safety. Congress acknowledged the vulnerability of undocumented immigrants to abuse and how immigration status can be used as a tool of abuse to keep a victim in the shadows and deny her access to safety and self-sufficiency. As a result, special immigration remedies were created through the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in 1994 and have been strengthened in each subsequent reauthorization of VAWA.

Understanding the cultural context alone is sometimes not enough to restore justice and provide safety for Latin@ survivors and their families. Important elements such as immigration laws, language barriers, increasing entanglement between local law enforcement and federal immigration enforcement efforts, anti-immigrant sentiments and the local and state policies impacting immigrants in the region where the violence is taking place, or where the survivor is able to flee from the violence, can have a  tremendous impact on their lives. At the same time, it is important to acknowledge and honor the tremendous courage and resiliency of an immigrant survivor who is reaching out for support to address issues of domestic violence, sexual assault, or trafficking. It is critical for advocates to understand the realities of immigrant survivors, the impact of current immigration laws and practices, as well as the best approaches and resources for supporting them in seeking safety and promoting social justice for ALL survivors.

For more resources and information on immigrant survivors' experiences of violence, see our Special Collections: Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence and Immigrant Women and Sexual Violence (Updated October 2013). These collections review legal protections and public benefits available to immigrant survivors, and offer best practices for increasing the effectiveness of services provided to immigrant women.
  • Domestic Abuse and Immigration: An Advocate’s Perspective | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by Casa De Esperanza (2008)
    This article explores the barriers that immigrant Latin@ domestic violence survivors face from the perspective of an advocate and provides culturally specific approaches to overcome such obstacles.
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  • Realidades Latinas: A National Survey on the Impact of Immigration and Language Access on Latina Survivors | PDF PDF (17 p.)
    by The National Domestic Violence Hotline and the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a Project of Casa de Esperanza (2013)
    This report provides an analysis of the results of a survey administered over a period of six weeks to over 1,300 Hotline callers who identified as Latin@ survivors of domestic violence. The questions were geared towards survivors’ experiences accessing services and demonstrated the challenges faced by survivors due to language access issues.
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Impact of Immigration Reform Policies

  • The Intersection of Immigrant Enforcement and the Child Welfare System | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by Rosie Hidalgo for SYNERGY, The Newsletter of the Resource Center on Domestic Violence: Child Protection & Custody. National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) (2013)
    This issue of Synergy is dedicated to immigration and child protection and custody issues in the context of domestic violence. In the lead article, Rosie Hidalgo, Casa de Esperanza’s Director of Public Policy, articulates the effects that these anti-immigrant laws are having on the U.S.-born children whose victim parents of domestic violence have been detained or deported because of their immigration status.
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  • Participatory Action Research with Latin@ Youth: Exploring Immigration and Domestic Violence | PDF PDF (11 p.)
    by Rebecca Rodriguez, La Voz Juvenil de Caminar Latino, Jessica Nunan, and Julia Perilla for the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities (2013)
    Immigrant Latin@ youth affected by domestic violence are in a unique position to provide researchers insight to the needs of their communities. This study engaged youth in participatory action research where they explored the impact of anti-immigration policies on families impacted by domestic violence.
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Legal Protections and Rights

  • Summary of Changes from VAWA Reauthorization 2013 | HTML HTML
    by the National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women (2013)
    This document reviews definitions, grant conditions, and changes included under various titles of the 2013 Violence Against Women Act.
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  • VAWA and TVPRA: What Practitioners Need to Know | PDF PDF (8 p.)
    by ASISTA (2013)
    This eight-page document provides an overview of substantive changes and technical fixes both in VAWA and the TVPRA as well as practice pointers for attorneys and advocates on how to work with these new changes.
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  • Order from the Attorney General: Final Specification of Community Programs Necessary for Protection of Life or Safety Under Welfare Reform Legislation | PDF PDF (4 p.)
    from the Department of Justice (January 16, 2001)
    This publication contains the final version of the Attorney General’s Order that is issued pursuant to sections 401 and 411 of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996. The Order specifies the types of community programs, services, or assistance for which all immigrants remain eligible regardless of status.
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  • Letter from the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    (January 19, 2001)
    This letter from the HUD Secretary clarifies that undocumented persons who are victims of domestic violence should not be denied access based on immigration status to shelters or transitional housing programs that receive federal funding.
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  • U Visa Law Enforcement Certification Resource Guide | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by the Department of Homeland Security (2012)
    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) provides this guidance to federal, state, local, tribal and territorial law enforcement officers. This public guidance primarily concerns law enforcement certifications for U nonimmigrant status, also known as U visas. The U visa is an immigration benefit that can be sought by victims of certain crimes who are currently assisting or have previously assisted law enforcement in the investigation or prosecution of a crime issues.
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  • Immigration Relief for Victims of Abuse and Domestic Violence | PDF PDF (46 p.)
    by Penn State Law’s Center for Immigrants’ Rights and the Centre County Women’s Resource Center (July 2012)
    This Handbook outlines immigration remedies for non-citizen victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. It is intended to aid attorneys who typically practice family law and have experience working with domestic violence victims. The Handbook hopes to aid such practitioners in expanding their services to those victims who also need legal help with their immigration issues.
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  • Latina Portrait: The Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act and Latinas | PDF PDF (36 p.)
    by Casa de Esperanza and Mujeres Latinas en Acción (2012)
    This publication provides an overview of the original VAWA legislation and its subsequent reauthorizations in 2000 and 2005, with a particular emphasis on how it relates to domestic violence and sexual assault experienced by Latina and immigrant women. Additionally, it provided an assessment of the VAWA reauthorization efforts in 2012 and made recommendations for moving forward. .
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  • Breaking Barriers: A Complete Guide to Legal Rights and Resources for Battered Immigrants | PDF PDF (488 p.)
    by Kathleen Sullivan and Leslye Orloff for the National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project (NIWAP), American University, Washington College of Law (July 2013)
    This manual provides information about domestic violence experienced by immigrant women, the multiple cultural, legal and economic factors that prevent battered immigrant women from seeking help, and how advocates can help rebuild social support networks.
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  • Empowering Survivors: Legal Rights of Immigrant Victims of Sexual Assault | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by Leslye Orloff (2013)
    This manual provides information that will be useful to advocates, attorneys, justice, and social services professionals working with and assisting immigrant survivors of sexual assault, as it contains several chapters devoted to immigration law topics.
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  • Know Your Rights/Conozca sus Derechos | PDF PDF / PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by Alicia (Lacy) Carra and Leslye E. Orloff for ASISTA and Legal Momentum (2009)
    This booklet provides information on the full range of immigration relief options created for immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking. For domestic violence victims a discussion of domestic violence protection orders and how they can help immigrant victims is included.
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  • Do you have problems at home?/Usted tiene problemas en el hogar? | PDF PDF / PDF PDF (9 p.)
    by Sonia Parras Conrad for ASISTA and Legal Momentum (2008)
    This brochure is designed for victims and their advocates providing a basic overview of immigrant victims’ legal rights with regard to protection orders, custody, immigration options, access to public benefits and the dynamics of domestic violence experienced by immigrant victims.
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  • Rights and Options for Battered Immigrant, Migrant, and Refugee Women | PDF PDF (44 p.)
    by Legal Momentum and Organización en California de Líderes Campesinas
    This booklet provides an overview of domestic violence experienced by immigrant victims and safety planning with immigrant victims.
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  • Understanding the New Immigration Remedy of “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals” and How This May Be Helpful for Immigrant Survivors | HTML HTML [96:00]
    by Rosie Hidalgo for Casa de Esperanza, and Mony Ruiz-Velasco for National Immigrant Justice Center (September 2012)
    On August 15, 2012 the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) began accepting applications for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This is a new policy which permits individuals under the age of 31, who arrived to the U.S. before the age of 15 and currently have undocumented legal status, to apply for deferred action if they meet certain criteria.
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  • Entendiendo El Nuevo Recurso Migratorio “Acción Diferida” Y Su Posible Utilidad Para L@S Inmigrantes Sobrevivientes De Violencia | HTML mp3 [1:27:00]
    by Rosie Hidalgo, Casa de Esperanza, y Mony Ruiz-Velasco for National Immigration Center (2012)
    El 15 de Agosto del 2012, los servicios de ciudadanía e inmigración de los Estados Unidos (USCIS, sus siglas en inglés) comenzaron a aceptar solicitudes para el programa de Acción Diferida (DACA, por sus siglas en inglés). Esta es una nueva póliza que le permite a personas menores de 31 años, quienes llegaron a los Estados Unidos antes de los 15 años de edad, y que actualmente se encuentran indocumentad@s, solicitar la Acción Diferida si cumplen con una serie de condiciones.
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Law Enforcement

  • Insecure Communities: Latino Perceptions of Police Involvement in Immigration Enforcement | PDF PDF ( p.)
    by Nik Theodore for the Department of Urban Planning and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago (May 2013)
    This report presents findings from a survey of Latinos regarding their perceptions of law enforcement authorities in light of the greater involvement of police in immigration enforcement. Lake Research Partners designed and administered a randomized telephone survey of 2,004 Latinos living in the counties of Cook (Chicago), Harris (Houston), Los Angeles, and Maricopa (Phoenix).
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  • Broken Trust | HTML HTML [6:36]
    by Enlace Comunitario (2010)
    Enlace Comunitario created the Broken Trust video in response to policies that have led to greater entanglement between local law enforcement and immigration enforcement, creating significant barriers for immigrant domestic violence victims and their children and increasing their fears.
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Broken Trust

  • National Survey of Service Providers on Police Response to Immigrant Crime Victims, U Visa Certification and Language Access | PDF PDF (42 p.)
    by Natalia Lee, Daniel J. Quinones, Nawal Ammar, and Leslye E. Orloff for the National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Network, American University, Washington College of Law (April 2013)
    This report explores police responses to immigrant victims of crime from the perspectives of various service providers, including legal services, pro bono attorneys, social service organizations, domestic violence/sexual assault programs, law enforcement and prosecutors’ offices.
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Economic Justice

The lack of financial independence is, in most cases, a key barrier that keeps many victims in violent and abusive relationships. Oftentimes perpetrators do everything possible to ensure that their partners do not get an education, find or retain employment, access work authorization, advance their careers or acquire financial knowledge. Therefore, achieving financial independence is a critical step in ensuring that survivors have options and have a chance to heal and ultimately live fulfilling lives.

  • ¡Sí Podemos! Yes We Can/Beyond Domestic Violence: Achieving Financial Independence | PDF PDF (13 p.)
    by Alianza (National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence) (2010)
    This curriculum contains practical tools for Latina survivors that are working on or reflecting about achieving their financial independence. A Trainers Guide for facilitators is also provided.
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  • ¡Sí Podemos! Yes We Can/Beyond Domestic Violence: Achieving Financial Independence Video | HTML HTML [28:12]
    by Alianza (National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence) (2010)
    This 28 minute video (English and Spanish version) accompanies the Achieving Financial Independence Curriculum. It features the lives and struggles of 5 Latina survivors of domestic violence who were able to start their own business and become financially independent.
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  • TRABAJADORAS: Challenges And Conditions Of Latina Workers In The United States | PDF PDF (140 p.)
    by Hector E. Sanchez, Andrea L. Delgado, Diana Villa, Ian Paul Fetterolf, and Juan Sebastian Velasquez for the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) (March 2012)
    The Trabajadoras report seeks to raise awareness about the realities that many Latinas face and the role that gender, ethnicity and immigration status play in influencing their social and economic standing in society. This report sheds light on the adversities that many Latinas are confronting at work and in their communities, sharing the stories of courageous and inspiring women.
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