Escape

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Skip Navigation

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

VAWA Reauthorization 2012

The 112th Congress failed to reauthorize VAWA in 2012, but fortunately, a bipartisan Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (S. 47) was reintroduced in the Senate on Tuesday, January 22, 2013, by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Senator Michael Crapo (R-ID). Below are resources that the National Latin@ Network contributed to as part of our efforts to promote a version of VAWA in 2012 that would protect ALL survivors, including immigrant women. To learn more about the current status of VAWA reuthorzation, please visit our VAWA Reauthorization 2013 page.

Background

VAWA was reintroduced in the Introduced by Senator Leahy (D-VT) and Senator Crapo (R-ID) on November 30, 2011, Senate Bill S.1925 passed on April 26, 2012 on a vote of 68-31. This bill kept all existing protections for immigrant victims in place and improves upon them. On April 27, 2012 Representative Sandy Adams (R-FL) introduced the House of Representative’s version of a VAWA reauthorization bill, H.R.4970. On May 16, 2012 H.R. 4970 passed the House by a narrow margin of 222-205.

H.R. 4970 would undermine years of bipartisan progress of advancing protections for immigrant victims. Some of H.R. 4970’s provisions would actually make immigrants more vulnerable and could endanger their lives with provisions that:

  1. Create bureaucratic and burdensome requirements that will weaken protections for victims and delay access to safety under the VAWA self-petition process;

  2. Impose arbitrary and unreasonable barriers for crime victims to apply for a U visa; and

  3. Place victims on a path from report to deport and discourage victims of crime from cooperating with law enforcement by denying access to lawful permanent resident status to many victims, which in many cases could result in separating abused mothers from their American-born children.

Archived Resources from VAWA Reauthorion 2012

Click here to learn about Myths and Facts about VAWA Reauthorization 2012 (pdf)

Click here to learn about the 2012 VAWA Reauthorization Related to Immigrant Provisions (pdf)

Click here to read the report, Latina Portrait: The Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act and Latinas, by the National Latin@ Network and Mujeres Latinas en Acción (pdf)